78. Erythema Multiforme, Stevens–Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

  1. Alan D. Irvine MD, FRCPI, FRCP2,3,
  2. Peter H. Hoeger MD4,5 and
  3. Albert C. Yan MD, FAAP, FAAD6,7
  1. Lizbeth Ruth A. Intong MD and
  2. Dédée F. Murrell MA, BMBCh, FAAD, MD

Published Online: 24 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch78

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

How to Cite

Intong, L. R. A. and Murrell, D. F. (2011) Erythema Multiforme, Stevens–Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, in Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition (eds A. D. Irvine, P. H. Hoeger and A. C. Yan), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch78

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

  2. 3

    Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 4

    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

  4. 5

    Catholic Children's Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany

  5. 6

    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  6. 7

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Dermatology, St. George Hospital and University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405176958

Online ISBN: 9781444345384

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Keywords:

  • diagnosis;
  • erythema multiforme;
  • management;
  • Stevens–Johnson syndrome;
  • toxic epidermal necrolysis

Summary

Erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are a group of diseases characterized by varying degrees of skin and mucosal involvement. They are generally associated with drugs, although a proportion of cases of erythema multiforme, and to a lesser degree Stevens-Johnson syndrome, are attributed to certain infections such as the herpes simplex virus. These diseases were previously thought to be a single spectrum of disease, with erythema multiforme being the mildest and toxic epidermal necrolysis being the most severe. However, there is evidence to show that erythema multiforme is now considered a distinct entity, whilst Stevens-Johnson syndrome, Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis overlap, and toxic epidermal necrolysis are variants of the same disease spectrum. As these conditions are quite rare and have associated significant morbidity, controversies exist in the management of the more severe variants, in particular, whether or not to give high-dose corticosteroids or intravenous immunoglobulin. This chapter will review these conditions and their current management.