98. Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia with Eosinophilia

  1. Alan D. Irvine MD, FRCPI, FRCP2,3,
  2. Peter H. Hoeger MD4,5 and
  3. Albert C. Yan MD, FAAP, FAAD6,7
  1. Alfons L. Krol MD, FRCPC

Published Online: 24 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch98

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

How to Cite

Krol, A. L. (2011) Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia with Eosinophilia, in Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition (eds A. D. Irvine, P. H. Hoeger and A. C. Yan), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch98

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

  2. 3

    Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 4

    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

  4. 5

    Catholic Children's Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany

  5. 6

    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  6. 7

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. Departments of Pediatrics and Dermatology, Doernbecher Children's Hospital, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405176958

Online ISBN: 9781444345384

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Keywords:

  • head and neck;
  • nodules;
  • peri-auricular;
  • rare;
  • vascular;
  • young adults

Summary

Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia is a rare, benign vascular proliferative disease of unknown aetiology. It most commonly presents in young adults from 20 to 40 years of age but does occur in childhood. Characteristic lesions are single to multiple pink to red-brown papules or nodules most commonly located on the head and neck region, particularly in the peri-auricular areas. Lesions may be pruritic or painful and spontaneous resolution is rare. Treatment is empirical and recurrences are frequent.