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Caribbean: English-speaking regional and external migration, 1830s–2000

Migration A–Z

C

  1. Bridget Brereton

Published Online: 4 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781444351071.wbeghm101

The Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration

The Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration

How to Cite

Brereton, B. 2013. Caribbean: English-speaking regional and external migration, 1830s–2000. The Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration. .

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 FEB 2013

Abstract

The people of the modern Caribbean descend from men and women brought to the region mainly through coerced or semi-coerced migrations, notably the transatlantic trade in enslaved Africans, and the post-emancipation schemes of Asian indentured immigration. It has been historically a region of massive in-migration, from Africa, Europe, and Asia. But after the end of slavery in the British Caribbean in the 1830s movement within the wider region, and out of it to Central, South, and North America, and to Europe, became a key aspect of life for the people of these territories. As soon as they were free to leave their own islands, they did so in large numbers, and outmigration – to many different destinations, which shifted according to opportunities and changing circumstances – became part of the lived experience of many (Richardson 2004).

Keywords:

  • political economy;
  • regional development;
  • immigration;
  • imperialism