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China: profit-driven institutions and emigration promotion

Migration A–Z

C

  1. Peter Kwong

Published Online: 4 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781444351071.wbeghm588

The Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration

The Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration

How to Cite

Kwong, P. 2013. China: profit-driven institutions and emigration promotion. The Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration. .

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 FEB 2013

Abstract

Both push and pull factors need to be present for a migration process to be completed. But pull factors are critical and controlling, in that if a receiving country does not allow immigrants to enter, or if there is no demand for their services, then, regardless of the desire of the would-be immigrants and the desperate problems of overpopulation, famine, or civil war they face in their home countries, they cannot emigrate. Having said that, the power of push factors can be greatly enhanced by the strength of collective migrant networks, which are capable, once the demand is established, of gathering together large numbers of immigrants very quickly to take advantage of the opportunity. The massive Chinese labor migration network, established and greatly improved over the last two centuries, is a case in point.

Keywords:

  • Asia;
  • labor;
  • labor supply;
  • capitalism;
  • immigration