Twenty-Three. The Late Epipaleolithic, Neolithic, and Chalcolithic of the Anatolian Plateau, 13,000–4000 BC

  1. D. T. Potts
  1. Douglas Baird

Published Online: 26 APR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781444360790.ch23

A Companion to the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East

A Companion to the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East

How to Cite

Baird, D. (2012) The Late Epipaleolithic, Neolithic, and Chalcolithic of the Anatolian Plateau, 13,000–4000 BC, in A Companion to the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (ed D. T. Potts), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444360790.ch23

Editor Information

  1. University of Sydney, Australia

Author Information

  1. University of Liverpool, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 APR 2012
  2. Published Print: 14 APR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405189880

Online ISBN: 9781444360790

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Keywords:

  • Anatolian plateau, Late Epipaleolithic;
  • Neolithic and Chalcolithic of the Anatolian peninsula;
  • environmental change, changing human behavior;
  • Anatolian plateau, farming in Europe;
  • sedentism, cultivation, and herding in Anatolia;
  • ritual, symbolic practices, and exchanges;
  • domestic cereals, at Boncuklu and Aşikli;
  • Anatolian plateau households, structured use of space;
  • strongly defined household identities, and social order

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Key Issues

  • Chronological Sequence

  • The Significance of Environmental Changes 13,000–3000 BC

  • The Development of Sedentism, Cultivation, and Herding in Anatolia

  • The Spread of “Farming” Through Anatolia and into Europe in the Neolithic

  • Settlements and Landscape Exploitation

  • The Apparent Lack of Neolithic Sites in North Anatolia

  • Question of Centers

  • Houses and Households

  • Hearths, Storage, and Size

  • Emergence of House Societies?

  • The Social Order

  • Ritual and Religion

  • Crafts and Specialization

  • Exchange

  • Conclusions

  • Guide to Further Reading