2. Social Values and Conservation Biogeography

  1. Richard J. Ladle2,3 and
  2. Robert J. Whittaker2
  1. Richard J. Ladle2,3,
  2. Paul Jepson2 and
  3. Lindsey Gillson1

Published Online: 7 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444390001.ch2

Conservation Biogeography

Conservation Biogeography

How to Cite

Ladle, R. J., Jepson, P. and Gillson, L. (2011) Social Values and Conservation Biogeography, in Conservation Biogeography (eds R. J. Ladle and R. J. Whittaker), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444390001.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 2

    School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

  2. 3

    Department of Agricultural Engineering, Federal University of Viçosa, Brazil

Author Information

  1. 1

    Plant Conservation Unit, Botany Department, University of Cape Town, South Africa

  2. 2

    School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

  3. 3

    Department of Agricultural Engineering, Federal University of Viçosa, Brazil

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 APR 2011
  2. Published Print: 18 FEB 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444335040

Online ISBN: 9781444390001

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Keywords:

  • social values and conservation biogeography;
  • practice of conservation of natural world - a social phenomenon;
  • effective conservation, key stakeholders - geographic patchwork of different values, cultural/societal differences;
  • humans, emotional affiliation to forms of life - in valuing life and living systems;
  • conservation biogeography, and social values - shaping geographic foci of action;
  • conservation values, and protected areas - international conservation treaties and conventions;
  • conservation values, ‘intrinsic’ and ‘instrumental’ - protecting nature, its value to humanity;
  • foundational values of modern conservation movement - social groups involved;
  • Victorian age passions, hunting and natural history - metropolitan elite's contact with nature at home;
  • global increase in protected areas, main drivers - legal frameworks for conservation in individual states, as the United Nations or European Commission

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Many values, many goals

  • The origins and values of different protected area types

  • Reserve designations from international conventions

  • An international system for categorizing protected areas

  • Social values and conservation practice

  • Concluding remarks

  • For discussion

  • Suggested reading