16. Roman–European Continuities: Conceptual and Historical Questions

  1. Johann P. Arnason doctoral Emeritus Professor Visiting Professor2 and
  2. Kurt A. Raaflaub PhD Professor Director3
  1. Peter Wagner PhD ICREA Research Professor

Published Online: 21 MAR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444390186.ch16

The Roman Empire in Context: Historical and Comparative Perspectives

The Roman Empire in Context: Historical and Comparative Perspectives

How to Cite

Wagner, P. (2011) Roman–European Continuities: Conceptual and Historical Questions, in The Roman Empire in Context: Historical and Comparative Perspectives (eds J. P. Arnason and K. A. Raaflaub), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444390186.ch16

Editor Information

  1. 2

    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia

  2. 3

    Brown University, USA

Author Information

  1. University of Barcelona, Spain

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2011
  2. Published Print: 28 JAN 2011

Book Series:

  1. The Ancient World: Comparative Histories

Book Series Editors:

  1. Kurt A. Raaflaub PhD

Series Editor Information

  1. Brown University, USA

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655573

Online ISBN: 9781444390186

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Roman–European continuities - conceptual and historical questions;
  • contemporary Europe, regarded as something - like a successor civilization to ancient Rome;
  • significance of question of Roman–European continuities - and difficulties in answering it;
  • social theory, evolutionary logic - at work in historical change;
  • Auguste Comte to Emile Durkheim to Talcott Parsons - scholars, understanding how their own society, evolved from earlier forms of sociopolitical organization;
  • Giddens, a compelling critique of functionalism - as a social theory, starting with a concept of “society”;
  • institutional continuity, Roman law - uncontroversial contenders, supporting argument about Roman–European continuity, Roman law and Christian belief;
  • continuity in justification of power - articulating separation of political and spiritual power;
  • investigating Roman–European continuities - languages of authority and their shifting sites;
  • best-known attempt, to revive the Roman “idiom of power” - Niccolò Machiavelli's interpretation of the Roman experience in his discourses

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • A Brief Note on Method

  • Arguments for Roman-European Continuity

  • Investigating Roman-European Continuities

  • Conclusion: Availability of Resources and Cultural Creativity

  • Acknowledgments

  • Notes

  • References