17. Violence, Aggression, and Militancy: Reexamining Gender, and Nonliberal Politics

  1. Isabelle Clark-Decès
  1. Tarini Bedi PhD, MA

Published Online: 27 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444390599.ch17

A Companion to the Anthropology of India

A Companion to the Anthropology of India

How to Cite

Bedi, T. (2011) Violence, Aggression, and Militancy: Reexamining Gender, and Nonliberal Politics, in A Companion to the Anthropology of India (ed I. Clark-Decès), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444390599.ch17

Editor Information

  1. Princeton University, USA

Author Information

  1. University of Chicago, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 APR 2011
  2. Published Print: 4 FEB 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405198929

Online ISBN: 9781444390599

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Keywords:

  • violence, aggression, and militancy - reexamining gender and nonliberal politics;
  • “extralegal” and militant tactics - by Bala, deep implication in local dynamics of power;
  • strategy making and “meaning making” - two sides of same coin, for Hindu nationalist women;
  • communalism, contradictory agenda - democratic and antidemocratic elements, spaces of power for women;
  • Shiv Sena, party and women's wing - named after Maratha warrior Shivaji, city of Mumbai by Bal Thackeray in 1966;
  • women and militancy - women into public sphere, problematizing issues of feminist politics;
  • women, passive, publicly aggressive - acting pathologically through ignorance or male control;
  • nonliberal politics, “feminized” iconographies - right-wing mobilization, femininity in religious terms;
  • nonliberal politics and “masculinization” of political practice - Hindutva movements;
  • right-wing women's violent mobilization in India - women's participation in communal violence

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Shiv Sena: A Brief Introduction to the Party and the Women's Wing

  • Women and Militancy: A Review and Reexamination

  • Nonliberal Politics and Embodied, “Feminized” Iconographies

  • Extending Ideas of Feminism?

  • Conclusion

  • References