11. Ear and Eye: Counteracting Senses in Loco-descriptive Poetry

  1. Charles Mahoney Associate Professor of English
  1. Adam Potkay Professor literature

Published Online: 3 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781444390650.ch11

A Companion to Romantic Poetry

A Companion to Romantic Poetry

How to Cite

Potkay, A. (2010) Ear and Eye: Counteracting Senses in Loco-descriptive Poetry, in A Companion to Romantic Poetry (ed C. Mahoney), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444390650.ch11

Editor Information

  1. University of Connecticut, USA

Author Information

  1. College of William and Mary, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 MAY 2012
  2. Published Print: 26 NOV 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405135542

Online ISBN: 9781444390650

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Keywords:

  • ear and eye - counteracting senses in loco-descriptive poetry;
  • “Loco-descriptive,” a Romantic-era phrase - for a poetic genre rooted in the eighteenth century;
  • Wordsworth, in a postscript to his sonnet sequence - The River Duddon (1820), an imaginary one-day walk from the source to the mouth of the river;
  • William Cowper in his perambulatory poem - “The Winter Morning Walk”;
  • Earl Wasserman, in Cooper's Hill to Shelley's Mont Blanc - finding variations on the cosmic/ political theme of concordia discors;
  • Broglio, a sensitive critic - finds in Wordsworth's corpus, a tension;
  • Thomson's music, misunderstanding Thomson - to control nature through striating it into well-defined visual bands;
  • Wordsworth and the “Social Accents” of Things;
  • Wordsworth's leap from death to sound - life meaning inasmuch as, and in the way that, music means;
  • Clare's song pictures, John Clare rhapsodizing his native environment - in what he called “song pictures”

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Audition and Attachment

  • Thomson's Music

  • Wordsworth and the “Social Accents” of Things

  • Counteracting Senses

  • Clare's Song Pictures

  • References and Further Reading