27. Romantic Poetry and Literary Theory: The Case of “A Slumber did my Spirit Seal”

  1. Charles Mahoney Associate Professor of English
  1. Marc Redfield Professor of English

Published Online: 3 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781444390650.ch27

A Companion to Romantic Poetry

A Companion to Romantic Poetry

How to Cite

Redfield, M. (2010) Romantic Poetry and Literary Theory: The Case of “A Slumber did my Spirit Seal”, in A Companion to Romantic Poetry (ed C. Mahoney), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444390650.ch27

Editor Information

  1. University of Connecticut, USA

Author Information

  1. Brown University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 MAY 2012
  2. Published Print: 26 NOV 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405135542

Online ISBN: 9781444390650

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Romantic poetry and literary theory - case of “A slumber did my spirit seal”;
  • “Romantic poetry” and “literary theory” - an obscure affinity, linking two familiar nominal clusters;
  • narrative prose, seeming to be - the favored literary genre;
  • gravitational field of literary theory - the power to warp appearances;
  • Luc Nancy's account of the “literary absolute” - dates, not coincidentally, from the Romantic era;
  • post–New Critical texts in the Norton theory anthology - focusing on a Romantic-era poem;
  • Wordsworth writing “A slumber did my spirit seal” - along with other important lyrics and an early draft of The Prelude;
  • “A slumber” between Brook's and Bateson's interpretations - as stark a question about reading as Miller has;
  • Knapp and Michaels's imagination - “the moment of imagining intentionless meaning, constituting the theoretical moment itself”;
  • Wordsworth's poem - ghostwrites its own theory, a text about Romantic poetry and literary theory can never be certain

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • I

  • II

  • III

  • IV

  • References and Further Reading