33. Ethical Supernaturalism: The Romanticism of Wordsworth, Heaney, and Lacan

  1. Charles Mahoney Associate Professor of English
  1. Guinn Batten Associate Professor of English

Published Online: 3 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781444390650.ch33

A Companion to Romantic Poetry

A Companion to Romantic Poetry

How to Cite

Batten, G. (2010) Ethical Supernaturalism: The Romanticism of Wordsworth, Heaney, and Lacan, in A Companion to Romantic Poetry (ed C. Mahoney), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444390650.ch33

Editor Information

  1. University of Connecticut, USA

Author Information

  1. Washington University in St. Louis, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 MAY 2012
  2. Published Print: 26 NOV 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405135542

Online ISBN: 9781444390650

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Keywords:

  • ethical supernaturalism - the Romanticism of Wordsworth, Heaney, and Lacan;
  • “Feeling into Words,” Seamus Heaney's - most celebrated and controversial essay (Heaney 1980).;
  • excavation of bogs, as sites of savagery, memory, and poetry for Wordsworth - exploration of erotics of political violence and ethics of affect;
  • “Romantic Enlightenment” - spurring Irish poets and Romantic scholars to seek to “know” the “feelings,” moods, passions, melancholia and anger;
  • Heaney's central topic in “Feeling into Words” - “The Redress of Poetry” limiting poet's role in a time of war;
  • Heaney's “Clearances” and Lacan's ethics of das Ding - earlier and more polemical “Feeling into Words”;
  • Salisbury Plain, Wordsworth noting - “impressive” effect of “the monuments and traces of antiquity scattered in abundance over that region”;
  • initial “apprehension of the tree” - Heaney claims, Wordsworth “instinctively realized” his true feelings in order to put them into words;
  • illimitable dimension of the Romantic sublime in a mind - turning against itself as against a “permanently impressive object”;
  • must judgment free itself from the teleology of self-completion - a legacy sustained by the critical heritage of Wordsworth and Kant

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • I

  • II

  • III

  • References and Further Reading