Twenty-Nine. Prosocial Behavior

  1. Peter K. Smith3 and
  2. Craig H. Hart4
  1. Joan E. Grusec1,
  2. Paul Hastings2 and
  3. Alisa Almas1

Published Online: 22 FEB 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444390933.ch29

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development, Second Edition

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development, Second Edition

How to Cite

Grusec, J. E., Hastings, P. and Almas, A. (2010) Prosocial Behavior, in The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development, Second Edition (eds P. K. Smith and C. H. Hart), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444390933.ch29

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Goldsmiths, University of London, London, England

  2. 4

    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

  2. 2

    Concordia University, West Montreal, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 22 FEB 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 DEC 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405196796

Online ISBN: 9781444390933

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Keywords:

  • Prosocial Behavior;
  • Aggression and other forms of antisocial behavior have captured the attention of developmental researchers;
  • features of empathy and prosocial behavior in children;
  • behavioral precursors of empathy and prosocial behavior emerge in the middle of the first year of life;
  • human abilities to apprehend and share another's emotional state, to feel sympathy and compassion;
  • Socialization of Prosocial Behavior in the Family;
  • Empathy (another's distress with a similar emotion) and sympathy (responding to another person's distress with feelings of sadness or concern) are vicarious affective responses;
  • Prosocial Behavior in the Cultural Context - manifested in different cultural contexts broadens considerably our understanding of concern for others;
  • “callous - unemotional” characteristic (Frick & White, 2008) involves a lack of empathy and guilt;
  • Developmental psychologists are more and more focused on the complex interplay between evolutionary processes, genetic predispositions, cultural experiences, and neurological and hormonal events

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The Development of Prosocial Behavior

  • Evolutionary Aspects

  • Genetic Underpinnings of Prosocial Behavior

  • The Socialization of Prosocial Behavior in the Family

  • The Socialization of Prosocial Behavior Outside the Family

  • Prosocial Behavior in the Cultural Context

  • Neurological and Hormonal Processes in Prosocial Behavior

  • Beyond Prosocial Behavior

  • Conclusion

  • References