Three. Conceptual Development and Emotion: A Neuropsychological Perspective

  1. Peter K. Smith2 and
  2. Craig H. Hart3
  1. Steven Woltering and
  2. Marc D. Lewis

Published Online: 22 FEB 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444390933.ch3

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development, Second Edition

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development, Second Edition

How to Cite

Woltering, S. and Lewis, M. D. (2010) Conceptual Development and Emotion: A Neuropsychological Perspective, in The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development, Second Edition (eds P. K. Smith and C. H. Hart), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444390933.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Goldsmiths, University of London, London, England

  2. 3

    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA

Author Information

  1. University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 22 FEB 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 DEC 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405196796

Online ISBN: 9781444390933

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Keywords:

  • conceptual development and emotion - a neuropsychological perspective;
  • philosophers and psychologists - cognition and emotion as phenomena, different underlying mechanisms;
  • models viewing emotions - integral part of our cognitive functioning;
  • connectionist models, understanding how it is possible - for an intelligent system to form internal representations;
  • concept formation embodied - action being important;
  • motivation, refining accounts of conceptual development - driven by similarity and emerging generalizations;
  • concept formation in infancy - focus on early and middle childhood;
  • pressures of peer influence - throughout middle childhood and adolescence;
  • neuropsychological correlates of concepts;
  • dopamine, critical fuel for motivated action loop

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Concept Formation and Desire

  • Conceptual Development in Childhood

  • The Neurobiology of Concepts and Desire

  • The Neuropsychology of Motivated Concept Formation

  • Implications

  • References