Seven. Sociological Perspectives on Social Development

  1. Peter K. Smith2 and
  2. Craig H. Hart3
  1. Gerald Handel

Published Online: 22 FEB 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444390933.ch7

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development, Second Edition

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development, Second Edition

How to Cite

Handel, G. (2010) Sociological Perspectives on Social Development, in The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Social Development, Second Edition (eds P. K. Smith and C. H. Hart), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444390933.ch7

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Goldsmiths, University of London, London, England

  2. 3

    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA

Author Information

  1. The City College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 22 FEB 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 DEC 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405196796

Online ISBN: 9781444390933

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Keywords:

  • sociological perspectives on social development;
  • sociological approaches to the study of children and child development;
  • child development and social development - not part of sociology's conceptual and theoretical vocabulary;
  • social interaction, encompassing - emotional and cognitive communication through language;
  • acceptability, innovation and creativity as well as conformity;
  • social structure, relatively enduring - changing through changes in patterns of social interaction;
  • concept of socialization, at both societal and individual levels - capturing the idea that a society reproduces itself;
  • infants, being born helpless - needing care, vocal but without speech, without interactive competence;
  • childhood and adult life - continuity or discontinuity;
  • contentment or discontentment with childhood - shaping the ongoing life course

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Social Interaction

  • Social Structure

  • Social Change

  • The Socialization Concept and Its Critics

  • Agencies of Socialization

  • Childhood and Adult Life: Continuity or Discontinuity?

  • Acknowledgment

  • References