10. Planning Amid Division: A Way Forward?

  1. Frank Gaffikin and
  2. Mike Morrissey

Published Online: 10 FEB 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444393200.ch10

Planning in Divided Cities: Collaborative Shaping of Contested Space

Planning in Divided Cities: Collaborative Shaping of Contested Space

How to Cite

Gaffikin, F. and Morrissey, M. (2011) Planning Amid Division: A Way Forward?, in Planning in Divided Cities: Collaborative Shaping of Contested Space, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444393200.ch10

Author Information

  1. Institute of Spatial and Environmental Planning, School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen's University, Belfast, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 10 FEB 2011
  2. Published Print: 11 MAR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405192187

Online ISBN: 9781444393200

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Keywords:

  • planning amid division - a way forward;
  • Belfast, like Nicosia and Jerusalem - latter end of spectrum;
  • building a civic city, adressing separatisms - related residential and social segregation;
  • paradoxes of peace building - peace building, set of central paradoxes in divided cities;
  • advocates of change and renewal - building relationships of trust across borders of division;
  • replacing ‘ethnic’ nationalism - blood and kin, linguistic and cultural roots;
  • paradoxes of planning in divided cities - and in planning;
  • strategies, for compensatory urban regeneration - under-development, inter-communal reconciliation as twin processes;
  • problem of community - de-centralising local community planning;
  • role of planning in narrowing contest - inter-disciplinary capacity in planning

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction: The Formidable Task

  • The Paradoxes of Peace Building

  • Planning Shared Futures in Divided Cities

  • The Paradoxes of Planning in Divided Cities

  • The Problem of Community

  • From Community Development to Community Capacity

  • The Role of Planning in Narrowing Contest

  • Implications for Planning, Governance, and Capacity

  • Final Considerations