F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925

  1. Christopher MacGowan

Published Online: 24 FEB 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781444393675.ch43

The Twentieth-Century American Fiction Handbook

The Twentieth-Century American Fiction Handbook

How to Cite

MacGowan, C. (2011) F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925, in The Twentieth-Century American Fiction Handbook, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444393675.ch43

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 FEB 2012
  2. Published Print: 21 JAN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405160230

Online ISBN: 9781444393675

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Keywords:

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (1925);
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald's first two novels, This Side of Paradise (1920) and The Beautiful and Damned (1922) - catching the new carefree, relaxed atmosphere of the affluent in the early 1920s;
  • power of wealth and the allure - to an outsider, its apparently limitless possibilities, a theme in Fitzgerald's fiction;
  • Fitzgerald, struggling with the composition - of his much delayed fourth novel, Tender is the Night (1934);
  • The Great Gatsby, exploring what money can and cannot buy - and broadening the theme to include the history of the continent itself;
  • Gatsby's story, by narrator Nick Carraway - distantly related to Daisy as well as being a college acquaintance of her husband Tom;
  • Nick Carraway's own story, mirroring the central narrative - like Gatsby, moving from the Midwest to the East, but Gatsby's fortune made illegally, and Nick's place in the world of money;
  • Gatsby, reawakening in Nick a capacity to dream - returning him to memories of his midwestern childhood;
  • Nick, describing crossing the Queensboro Bridge - view of New York, that seems to offer a “wild promise of all the mystery and the beauty in the world,”

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Bibliography