Amy Tan, The Joy Luck Club, New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1989

  1. Christopher MacGowan

Published Online: 24 FEB 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781444393675.ch66

The Twentieth-Century American Fiction Handbook

The Twentieth-Century American Fiction Handbook

How to Cite

MacGowan, C. (2011) Amy Tan, The Joy Luck Club, New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1989, in The Twentieth-Century American Fiction Handbook, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444393675.ch66

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 FEB 2012
  2. Published Print: 21 JAN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405160230

Online ISBN: 9781444393675

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Keywords:

  • Amy Tan, The Joy Luck Club, New York - G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1989;
  • Amy Tan's novel of four immigrant mothers and their American daughters - centering on Chinese American experience, wide acclaim in the 1970s and 1980s;
  • The Joy Luck Club, not a conventional novel - its 16 stories and seven narrators, linked through a common immigrant heritage;
  • Lindo Jong's daughter, Waverly, naïvely fears - that if she visits China, she may so blend in that “they don't let me come back to the United States”;
  • key difference between childhood of the mothers in China - and also of their mothers;
  • Lindo Jong, having no multiple choices - at the age of two, a matchmaker arranges her marriage to a boy in a neighborhood family;
  • Ying-ying St. Clair's marriage to her first, philandering, husband - and Suyuan Woo, loosing her first husband, as a result of the Japanese invasion of China;
  • The three married daughters, using their freedom of choice - to marry outside of the Chinese community;
  • Waverly's marriage, result of an elopement - part of a pattern of rebelling against her mother's expectations;
  • Lena St. Clair, sensing her mother's hidden past - Clifford St. Clair's suffocating protectiveness of his wife, feeling that her mother had disappeared and become “a ghost”

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Bibliography