11. Maternal–Fetal Cell Trafficking and Microchimerism

  1. Helen H. Kay MD4,
  2. D. Michael Nelson MD, PhD4 and
  3. Yuping Wang MD, PhD5
  1. Hilary S. Gammill MD1,2,
  2. Suzanne E. Peterson MD1 and
  3. J. Lee Nelson MD2,3

Published Online: 21 MAR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444393927.ch11

The Placenta: From Development to Disease, From Development to Disease

The Placenta: From Development to Disease, From Development to Disease

How to Cite

Gammill, H. S., Peterson, S. E. and Nelson, J. L. (2011) Maternal–Fetal Cell Trafficking and Microchimerism, in The Placenta: From Development to Disease, From Development to Disease (eds H. H. Kay, D. M. Nelson and Y. Wang), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444393927.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine and Ultrasound-Genetics, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington, University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA

  2. 5

    Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center – Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA

  2. 2

    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA

  3. 3

    Department of Rheumatology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2011
  2. Published Print: 1 APR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333664

Online ISBN: 9781444393927

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Keywords:

  • maternal–fetal cell trafficking - and microchimerism;
  • mechanisms and molecules - regulating imprinting;
  • genetic imprinting - autosomal chromosomes and genes, one copy maternally inherited, the other paternally inherited;
  • imprinting in human placenta;
  • molecular regulation of imprinting - the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) region on chromosome 11p15.5;
  • parental “nutrient-allocation conflict theory”;
  • imprinted gene function in development;
  • imprinted X inactivation in placenta;
  • hydatidiform moles (HM), abnormal pregnancies - defective embryo development and abnormal hypertrophic trophoblast with malignant potential;
  • placental imprinting - in obstetric and reproductive disorders

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Historical perspective–Redefining the placental barrier

  • Detection of Mc

  • Cellular exchange during pregnancy

  • Brief review of consequences of persistent Mc

  • Malignancy

  • Conclusions

  • Acknowledgements

  • References