14. Egg Donation and Surrogacy

  1. Emre Seli MD3,4,5
  1. Mark V. Sauer MD1 and
  2. Joshua U. Klein MD2

Published Online: 8 MAR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444393958.ch14

Infertility

Infertility

How to Cite

Sauer, M. V. and Klein, J. U. (2011) Egg Donation and Surrogacy, in Infertility (ed E. Seli), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444393958.ch14

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

  2. 4

    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

  3. 5

    Oocyte Donation and Gestational Surrogacy Program, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, USA

  2. 2

    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University, New York, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 MAR 2011
  2. Published Print: 23 MAR 2011

Book Series:

  1. Gynecology in Practice

Book Series Editors:

  1. Aydin Arici

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333534

Online ISBN: 9781444393958

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Keywords:

  • egg donation and surrogacy;
  • egg and embryo donation - successful of all techniques in ever-increasing armamentarium of assisted reproductive technologies (ART);
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - egg donation performed in the United States;
  • DIVF recipients, falling - into one of four major diagnostic categories;
  • required medical screening - for DIVF recipients;
  • donors in the United States - anonymous egg donors, financially compensated for their participation;
  • guidelines for management of egg donors - published by ASRM;
  • schematic of synchronization of donor and recipient - using GnRH agonist down-regulation;
  • recipient monitoring of DIVF recipient, ovulatory - without compromising on chances of a successful pregnancy;
  • gestational surrogacy, treatment options - couples, with no healthy uterus to carry a pregnancy

Summary

Egg donation has been widely practiced for over two decades and is available throughout the United States. In recent years, donor egg in-vitro fertilization (DIVF) has represented about 10% of all initiated cycles of assisted reproduction. In general, success rates are the highest seen in the field of IVF, with over 50% of embryo transfers resulting in a live birth. Most DIVF recipients are older and would otherwise not be capable of conceiving with their own eggs. Extensive clinical experience has demonstrated that uterine receptivity remains normal in menopausal women if they are adequately treated with hormonal preparation prior to embryo transfer. Because older women generally experience increased rates of morbidity once pregnant, it is vitally important to screen candidates adequately for concomitant health problems prior to embarking on DIVF therapy.