40. Segregation

Part II

  1. John A. Agnew2 and
  2. James S. Duncan3
  1. Steve Herbert

Published Online: 14 JUL 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444395839.ch40

The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Human Geography

The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Human Geography

How to Cite

Herbert, S. (2011) Segregation, in The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Human Geography (eds J. A. Agnew and J. S. Duncan), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444395839.ch40

Editor Information

  1. 2

    UCLA, Los Angeles, USA

  2. 3

    University of Cambridge, UK

Author Information

  1. University of Washington, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 JUL 2011
  2. Published Print: 8 APR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405189897

Online ISBN: 9781444395839

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • segregation - social actors kept separate from one another, through manifold and ever-increasing formal and informal acts;
  • potential federal regulations - proposed yearly in the United States;
  • lines abounding in modern life - social actors kept separate from one another;
  • segregation, an overdetermined social phenomenon - its wellsprings, deep and varied;
  • need for social groups to make symbolic distinctions - physical separations from one another, being difficult to explain definitively;
  • significant consequence of powerlessness - of undocumented migrants, their inability to resist economic exploitation;
  • segregation, being intransigent - its consequences bearing consideration;
  • segregation being inevitable - humans making social distinctions, regularly finding expression in spatial arrangements;
  • degree of integration, occurring - while groups maintain their own sense of themselves

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction: A World of Lines

  • Why Segregate?

  • How Segregate?

  • Why Does it Matter?

  • Conclusion

  • References