11. ‘No Hits, No Runs, Just Terrors’: Exhibition, Cultural Distinctions and Cult Audiences at the Rialto Cinema in the 1930s and 1940s

  1. Richard Maltby2,
  2. Daniel Biltereyst3 and
  3. Philippe Meers4
  1. Tim Snelson and
  2. Mark Jancovich

Published Online: 20 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444396416.ch11

Explorations in New Cinema History: Approaches and Case Studies

Explorations in New Cinema History: Approaches and Case Studies

How to Cite

Snelson, T. and Jancovich, M. (2011) ‘No Hits, No Runs, Just Terrors’: Exhibition, Cultural Distinctions and Cult Audiences at the Rialto Cinema in the 1930s and 1940s, in Explorations in New Cinema History: Approaches and Case Studies (eds R. Maltby, D. Biltereyst and P. Meers), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444396416.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Flinders University, South Australia

  2. 3

    Department of Communication Studies, Ghent University, Belgium

  3. 4

    University of Antwerp, Belgium

Author Information

  1. University of East Anglia, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 APR 2011
  2. Published Print: 8 APR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405199490

Online ISBN: 9781444396416

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Keywords:

  • venues and their publics - ‘no hits, no runs, just terrors’ exhibition, cultural distinctions and cult audiences at Rialto Cinema, 1930s and 1940s;
  • film exhibition history, and shared pleasures - the Balaban and Katz chain, successful and imitated exhibitors of 1920s;
  • exhibition practices of Rialto Cinema in Times Square, New York - opposition to Balaban and Katz chain;
  • The Rialto, example of a cinema - imbued with character, venue for cult movie scenes;
  • Arthur Mayer, and the Rialto against Hollywood - othering of femininity, subcultural tastes;
  • the theatre, bought by local impresario ‘Roxy’ Rothafel - the Rialto as New York's first stageless motion picture house;
  • Mayer's new Art Moderne theatre - distinguished, by its minimalism, utilitarianism and restraint;
  • Mayer, and the Rialto's programming - ‘better pictures’ for a new movie-going public;
  • success of Rebecca (1940), women's films - as horror films, featuring female leads;
  • Mayer's cultivation of disreputable image - puns and plays on words

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Reversing the Deluxe Policy: Location, Service, the Building and Programming

  • ‘As Offensively Unfeminine as a Sailor's Pipe’: Gender, Taste and Subcultural Capital

  • Making Fun: Sensational, Humorous and Disreputable

  • ‘Homicide Connoisseurs’: Cult Audiences, Cultural Capital and Class Tastes

  • Conclusion

  • References