15. The Social Biograph: Newspapers as Archives of the Regional Mass Market for Movies

  1. Richard Maltby2,
  2. Daniel Biltereyst3 and
  3. Philippe Meers4
  1. Paul S. Moore

Published Online: 20 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444396416.ch15

Explorations in New Cinema History: Approaches and Case Studies

Explorations in New Cinema History: Approaches and Case Studies

How to Cite

Moore, P. S. (2011) The Social Biograph: Newspapers as Archives of the Regional Mass Market for Movies, in Explorations in New Cinema History: Approaches and Case Studies (eds R. Maltby, D. Biltereyst and P. Meers), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444396416.ch15

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Flinders University, South Australia

  2. 3

    Department of Communication Studies, Ghent University, Belgium

  3. 4

    University of Antwerp, Belgium

Author Information

  1. Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 APR 2011
  2. Published Print: 8 APR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405199490

Online ISBN: 9781444396416

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Keywords:

  • cinema, modernity and the local - social biograph, newspapers, archives of mass market for movies;
  • ‘Social Biograph’ lasting into 1909 - next to advertising for town's new nickel shows;
  • ‘Town Topics’, nonchalant compilation - indiscriminate social and commercial happenings;
  • early moviegoing in Toronto - urban routines, and mass culture out of big-city moviegoing;
  • newspapers and modernity - mass market in North America, entrepreneurial showmen;
  • exhibition, avenue through which cinema - culturally meaningful to North American population;
  • Jacqueline Stewart's history of migrant black moviegoing in Chicago - modern in marginalised population;
  • typology's reliability - typology of ways cinema appears in newspapers;
  • methods of searching newspapers - by population of place;
  • theory or generalised history - understanding complex industrial context

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Newspapers and Modernity

  • Verifying the Typology's Reliability

  • Conclusion

  • Acknowledgements

  • References