2. Exploration, Trading, Trapping, Travel, and Early Fiction, 1780–1850

  1. Nicolas S. Witschi
  1. Edward Watts

Published Online: 27 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444396591.ch2

A Companion to the Literature and Culture of the American West

A Companion to the Literature and Culture of the American West

How to Cite

Watts, E. (2011) Exploration, Trading, Trapping, Travel, and Early Fiction, 1780–1850, in A Companion to the Literature and Culture of the American West (ed N. S. Witschi), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444396591.ch2

Editor Information

  1. Western Michigan University, USA

Author Information

  1. Michigan State University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 15 APR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405187336

Online ISBN: 9781444396591

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Keywords:

  • regions and histories - exploration, trading, trapping, travel and early fiction, 1780–1850;
  • “American” narrative of western travel - Journey to the Unknown Parts of America in the Years 1786 & 1787 by “Alonso Decalves,” better known as John Trumbull;
  • Trumbull and Poe, space between “travelers and travel liars” - in the terms, of Percy Adams;
  • eighteenth century, travelers' narratives - European print culture, non-fiction genres, and British fiction;
  • transmutation of facts of exploring expedition - trading venture, or a military conflict;
  • the West, subordinating its identity - patterns of misrepresentation, exoticization and trivialization;
  • explorers, Lewis and Clark's Ghostwriters - and Edwin James-Biddle's “Varnished”;
  • Biddle's goal, clearing the West - of resistance to Anglo-American colonization and settlement;
  • trappers and traders, Kit Carson and James Pattie – Carson, becoming an Indian-hating renegade;
  • fiction, and James Fenimore Cooper - and William Snelling, vision of the Golden West, national imaginary

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Part One. Explorers: Lewis and Clark's Ghostwriters, and Edwin James

  • Part Two. Trappers and Traders: Kit Carson and James Pattie

  • Part Three. Travelers and Tourists: Francis Parkman and John Wyeth

  • Part Four. Fiction: James Fenimore Cooper and William Snelling

  • Conclusion

  • References and Further Reading