12. Ut Pictura Hortus/Ut Theatrum Hortus: Theatricality and French Picturesque Garden Theory (1771–95)

  1. Caroline van Eck2 and
  2. Stijn Bussels3
  1. Bram van Oostveldt

Published Online: 20 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444396744.ch12

Theatricality in Early Modern Art and Architecture

Theatricality in Early Modern Art and Architecture

How to Cite

van Oostveldt, B. (2011) Ut Pictura Hortus/Ut Theatrum Hortus: Theatricality and French Picturesque Garden Theory (1771–95), in Theatricality in Early Modern Art and Architecture (eds C. van Eck and S. Bussels), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444396744.ch12

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Leiden University, The Netherlands

  2. 3

    University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Author Information

  1. University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 APR 2011
  2. Published Print: 14 APR 2011

Book Series:

  1. Art History Book Series

Book Series Editors:

  1. David Peters Corbett4 and
  2. Christine Riding5

Series Editor Information

  1. 4

    University of East Anglia, London, Uk

  2. 5

    Tate, London, Uk

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444339024

Online ISBN: 9781444396744

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Keywords:

  • Ut pictura hortus/ut theatrum hortus - theatricality and French Picturesque Garden Theory (1771–95);
  • picturesque vogue, in eighteenth-century garden design - landscape painting and gardening relationship;
  • Maria Theresia's reign, and gardens of Schönbrunn - a favourite setting, reciting verses of Pietro Metastasio;
  • entire gardens, spatial structuring - lanes, porticoes, statues reminding one of Palladian scenography, as theatre spaces;
  • theatrical references, and Carmontelle' desire - picturesque garden, displaying Egyptian pyramids, Roman Temples, Gothick ruins and Turkish pavilions;
  • theatre and society, and contemporary theorists - historians of theatricality, from Elizabeth Burns, in the 1970s;
  • regime of truth, assumptions - beyond the theatrical organization of society, new and forceful expression in second half of eighteenth century;
  • naturalness and visuality, both theatricality and naturalness - in discourses;
  • ‘natural’ and non-theatrical performance - a double strategy of forgetting, and position of spectator

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Theatrical References

  • Anti-Theatrical Sentiments

  • Theatre and Society

  • Naturalness and Visuality

  • Theatre and Spectator

  • Painting and Spectator

  • Garden and Spectator

  • Conclusion