2. ‘Theatricality’ in Tapestries and Mystery Plays and its Afterlife in Painting

  1. Caroline van Eck2 and
  2. Stijn Bussels3
  1. Laura Weigert

Published Online: 20 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444396744.ch2

Theatricality in Early Modern Art and Architecture

Theatricality in Early Modern Art and Architecture

How to Cite

Weigert, L. (2011) ‘Theatricality’ in Tapestries and Mystery Plays and its Afterlife in Painting, in Theatricality in Early Modern Art and Architecture (eds C. van Eck and S. Bussels), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444396744.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Leiden University, The Netherlands

  2. 3

    University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Author Information

  1. Rutgers University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 APR 2011
  2. Published Print: 14 APR 2011

Book Series:

  1. Art History Book Series

Book Series Editors:

  1. David Peters Corbett4 and
  2. Christine Riding5

Series Editor Information

  1. 4

    University of East Anglia, London, Uk

  2. 5

    Tate, London, Uk

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444339024

Online ISBN: 9781444396744

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Keywords:

  • ‘Theatricality’ in tapestries - and mystery plays, and its afterlife in painting;
  • Hubert Cailleau's drawing, key sites - Passion plays, God's domain in heaven vying with limbo and an enormous hell mouth;
  • image types, experiences of a mystery play - not a preoccupation of scholars;
  • reception, focus of Pamela Sheingorn and Robert Clark's work - mystery play scripts as ‘performative’;
  • historical moments, of pictures and plays - representational mode engaging audiences;
  • visual and affective resemblance - between two media, the ‘Vengeance of our Lord’, the ‘Vengeance of Jesus Christ’, or the ‘Vengeance’;
  • ‘alterity of medieval religious drama’ - Rainer Warning's term, lacking designated fixed boundaries, circumscribing traditional modern theatre;
  • ‘Vengeance’ performance in Mons - and tapestries in Tournai and New York, fluidity between spaces of actors and spectators of the play;
  • Reims paintings, a vision of a ‘Vengeance’ play – impossibility in actual performance;
  • The Parliament of Paris's support - protection of the Confraternity of the Passion, controlling religious drama performance