Money Games: Currencies and Power in the Contemporary World Economy

  1. Noel Castree2,
  2. Paul Chatterton3,
  3. Nik Heynen4,
  4. Wendy Larner5 and
  5. Melissa W. Wright6
  1. John Agnew

Published Online: 16 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397352.ch10

The Point is to Change it: Geographies of Hope and Survival in an Age of Crisis

The Point is to Change it: Geographies of Hope and Survival in an Age of Crisis

How to Cite

Agnew, J. (2010) Money Games: Currencies and Power in the Contemporary World Economy, in The Point is to Change it: Geographies of Hope and Survival in an Age of Crisis (eds N. Castree, P. Chatterton, N. Heynen, W. Larner and M. W. Wright), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397352.ch10

Editor Information

  1. 2

    School of Environment and Development, University of Manchester, UK

  2. 3

    School of Geography, University of Leeds, UK

  3. 4

    Department of Geography, University of Georgia, USA

  4. 5

    School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, UK

  5. 6

    Department of Geography, Pennsylvania State University, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Geography, UCLA, Los Angeles CA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAY 2012
  2. Published Print: 13 APR 2010

Book Series:

  1. Antipode Book Series

Book Series Editors:

  1. Noel Castree

Series Editor Information

  1. School of Environment and Development, University of Manchester, UK

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405198349

Online ISBN: 9781444397352

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Keywords:

  • money games;
  • exchange rates;
  • power

Summary

A well-known cliché has it that “money makes the world go round” Certainly, monetary arrangements, specifically exchange-rate mechanisms, can serve to show the degree to which markets and states intersect to direct the workings of the world economy. It is common to assume that the singular model over recent decades has been a neoliberal one based on independent floating exchange rates. I challenge this assumption by showing that a number of different combinations of money and power have operated in the recent past, creating a number of distinctive “money games”. Only one of these, the globalist/transnational, is facing a particularly severe crisis. The others, what I term the classic/territorial, integrative/shared, and imperialist/substitute provide available alternatives. The recent history, geographical features, and future prospects of the various money games are the main concerns of the essay. The analysis welcomes the recent financial crisis as providing an opportunity to further pluralize political-economic visions beyond the perceived dominant one-size-fits-all neoliberal ideology of the globalist regime.