The Shape of Capitalism to Come

  1. Noel Castree2,
  2. Paul Chatterton3,
  3. Nik Heynen4,
  4. Wendy Larner5 and
  5. Melissa W. Wright6
  1. Paul Cammack

Published Online: 16 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397352.ch12

The Point is to Change it: Geographies of Hope and Survival in an Age of Crisis

The Point is to Change it: Geographies of Hope and Survival in an Age of Crisis

How to Cite

Cammack, P. (2010) The Shape of Capitalism to Come, in The Point is to Change it: Geographies of Hope and Survival in an Age of Crisis (eds N. Castree, P. Chatterton, N. Heynen, W. Larner and M. W. Wright), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397352.ch12

Editor Information

  1. 2

    School of Environment and Development, University of Manchester, UK

  2. 3

    School of Geography, University of Leeds, UK

  3. 4

    Department of Geography, University of Georgia, USA

  4. 5

    School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, UK

  5. 6

    Department of Geography, Pennsylvania State University, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Politics and Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAY 2012
  2. Published Print: 13 APR 2010

Book Series:

  1. Antipode Book Series

Book Series Editors:

  1. Noel Castree

Series Editor Information

  1. School of Environment and Development, University of Manchester, UK

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405198349

Online ISBN: 9781444397352

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • ASEAN;
  • capitalism;
  • competitiveness;
  • neoliberalism;
  • IMF;
  • OECD;
  • World Bank

Summary

The starting point for this paper is the observation that a reshaping of global capitalism is underway, centred on the rise of dynamic centres of accumulation in Asia. It is argued that a critical understanding of this process (supported without reservation by such organizations as the IMF, the OECD and theWorld Bank) requires a questioning of the imagined link between “capitalism” and the “West”, and a recognition that the international organizations are committed to a universal project aimed at empowering capital and promoting competitiveness on a global scale. A case study is provided of the recently adopted plan for the creation of an ASEAN Economic Community as a “single market and productive space” by 2015. The regional context in which it is placed is contrasted with that of the European Union, and the need for further study of varieties of capitalism in emerging economies is noted.