31. Assessing Manpower Needs in Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy: Lessons from the Past and Implications for the Future of Endoscopic Training

  1. Jonathan Cohen MD
  1. Girish Mishra MD, MSc, FACG, FACP1 and
  2. Alan Barkun MD, CM, FRCP(C), FACP, MSc2

Published Online: 26 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397772.ch31

Successful Training in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

Successful Training in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

How to Cite

Mishra, G. and Barkun, A. (2011) Assessing Manpower Needs in Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy: Lessons from the Past and Implications for the Future of Endoscopic Training, in Successful Training in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ed J. Cohen), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397772.ch31

Editor Information

  1. New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Endoscopy & GI Fellowship Program, Section on Gastroenterology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA

  2. 2

    Division of Gastroenterology, McGill University, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 APR 2011
  2. Published Print: 27 MAY 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405196635

Online ISBN: 9781444397772

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Manpower;
  • endoscopy;
  • training;
  • modeling;
  • screening colonoscopy;
  • CT colonography;
  • surgeon endoscopist;
  • future needs;
  • learning;
  • competency

Summary

Assessing manpower needs as it relates to endoscopic training is a timely but challenging question. Implicit in the term “manpower” is the inevitable link to basic economic principles. This chapter explores the methodologies used and reviews the literature explaining how physician workforces, in general, along with subspecialists, are calculated. Such modeling in gastroenterology is discussed and critiqued, including a review of underlying assumptions, limitations, and lessons for the future. The impact of competing strategies, such as CT colonography, on future endoscopic needs is also highlighted. Competing manpower from related fields, including surgical specialties, is also included in the overall discussion, as they too struggle to meet an increased training demand. The chapter concludes with a review of a recent consensus conference in which leaders of key professional societies acknowledge the potential for decreased endoscopic demands in gastroenterology, but offer an optimistic outlook of future opportunities.