11. Clinical Trial Measures of the Non-Motor Features of Parkinson's Disease

  1. C. Warren Olanow MD, FRCPC2,3,4,
  2. Fabrizio Stocchi MD, PhD5 and
  3. Anthony E. Lang MD, FRCPC6,7,8
  1. Karl Kieburtz MD, MPH

Published Online: 27 JUN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397970.ch11

Parkinson's Disease: Non-Motor and Non-Dopaminergic Features

Parkinson's Disease: Non-Motor and Non-Dopaminergic Features

How to Cite

Kieburtz, K. (2011) Clinical Trial Measures of the Non-Motor Features of Parkinson's Disease, in Parkinson's Disease: Non-Motor and Non-Dopaminergic Features (eds C. W. Olanow, F. Stocchi and A. E. Lang), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397970.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

  2. 3

    Department of Neuroscience, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

  3. 4

    Robert and John M. Bendheim Parkinson's Disease Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

  4. 5

    Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Research Centre, Institute for Research and Medical Care, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome, Italy

  5. 6

    Division of Neurology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

  6. 7

    Parkinson's Disease Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

  7. 8

    Movement Disorder Centre, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada

Author Information

  1. Department of Neurology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 JUN 2011
  2. Published Print: 29 JUL 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405191852

Online ISBN: 9781444397970

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Keywords:

  • Parkinson's disease;
  • non-motor;
  • clinical trials;
  • outcome measures

Summary

Despite the high prevalence of non-motor symptoms across a range of Parkinson's disease (PD) severity, there is still a paucity of well-designed and validated instruments. Scales for cognition and mood are perhaps the most advanced. There is more limited experience with scales for psychosis in PD. Scales for autonomic dysfunction and sleep are even less well developed. There is a pressing need for standardization and validation of these instruments to assess the impact of treatments on these domains. Initial experience with scales not directed at specific domains of impairment (e.g., mood, cognition) but focused on disability and health-related quality-of-life can be responsive to treatment effects and have utility in clinical trials. The data collected to date suggest that non-motor symptoms contribute heavily to the worsening of health-related quality-of-life in PD patients. A major challenge for the near future is to define the natural rate of progression of these features and to develop reliable, validated instruments to assess these features that are generally accepted and used across multiple centers for evaluating the potential value of new study interventions. New long-term study designs which capture cumulative disability related to both motor and non-motor features are likely to be increasingly more widely employed.