12. Clinical Features of Dementia Associated with Parkinson's Disease and Dementia with Lewy Bodies

  1. C. Warren Olanow MD, FRCPC2,3,4,
  2. Fabrizio Stocchi MD, PhD5 and
  3. Anthony E. Lang MD, FRCPC6,7,8
  1. David J. Burn FRCP, MD, MA

Published Online: 27 JUN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397970.ch12

Parkinson's Disease: Non-Motor and Non-Dopaminergic Features

Parkinson's Disease: Non-Motor and Non-Dopaminergic Features

How to Cite

Burn, D. J. (2011) Clinical Features of Dementia Associated with Parkinson's Disease and Dementia with Lewy Bodies, in Parkinson's Disease: Non-Motor and Non-Dopaminergic Features (eds C. W. Olanow, F. Stocchi and A. E. Lang), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397970.ch12

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

  2. 3

    Department of Neuroscience, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

  3. 4

    Robert and John M. Bendheim Parkinson's Disease Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

  4. 5

    Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Research Centre, Institute for Research and Medical Care, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome, Italy

  5. 6

    Division of Neurology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

  6. 7

    Parkinson's Disease Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

  7. 8

    Movement Disorder Centre, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada

Author Information

  1. Clinical Ageing Research Unit, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 JUN 2011
  2. Published Print: 29 JUL 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405191852

Online ISBN: 9781444397970

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Keywords:

  • Parkinson's disease;
  • dementia;
  • dementia with Lewy bodies;
  • clinical

Summary

Dementia is a common problem in Parkinson's disease (PD) that can be divided into Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). This is based on the chronologic sequence of the development of these problems, but the two conditions do not differ in any significant respect with regard to clinical features or pathology, and both may display phenotypic heterogeneity. Collectively they are known as the Lewy body dementias. As the main difference between them lies in the order of the temporal evolution of the dementia and the parkinsonism, this may determine to which specialist the condition first presents, and which are considered to be the dominant problems. Managing either condition is challenging because of the range of impairments which include not only cognitive failure, but also extrapyramidal features, a heavy neuropsychiatric burden, and autonomic dysfunction. Diagnostic criteria are now available for making the diagnosis of DLB or PDD. These should assist clinicians with more accurate diagnosis and also highlight the important clinical features that characterize these disorders.