119. Muscle Spasms Following a Spider Bite

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch119

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) Muscle Spasms Following a Spider Bite, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch119

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

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Keywords:

  • Case 9, muscle spasms - following a spider bite;
  • diagnosis - black widow envenomation;
  • discussion, black widow spiders (Latrodectus species) - in all continents, except Antarctica;
  • spider's web, disheveled appearance - in dark, dry locations near human habitations;
  • venom of black widow - containing alpha-latrotoxin;
  • pinprick sensation - felt at bite site;
  • systemic signs, and symptoms - progressing over 60–120 minutes;
  • muscle cramping, finding - associated with black widow envenomation;
  • wounds, irrigated - and tetanus prophylaxis administered, if appropriate;
  • antivenin, risk of anaphylaxis - administration, in hospitals with full resuscitation capabilities

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading