120. Necrotic Skin Lesion

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch120

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) Necrotic Skin Lesion, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch120

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

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Keywords:

  • Case 10, necrotic skin lesion;
  • diagnosis - Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG);
  • discussion of PG, uncommon inflammatory - painful, ulcerating skin disease of unknown etiology, three clinical variants;
  • classic PG, ulcers on lower legs - atypical PG, superficial ulcerations with bluish-gray border on upper extremities and face;
  • peristomal PG, and ulcers - around stomas, in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD);
  • dermatologic consultation - for identifying cause of ulcer;
  • currently, there being - no gold standard treatment for PG;
  • most commonly used immunosuppressive agents - for treating PG, intralesional or oral glucocorticoids;
  • meticulous wound care - for pathergy and infection prevention;
  • prognosis for patients with PG – favorable, if underlying disease being identified

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading