129. Exposed during a Blizzard

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch129

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) Exposed during a Blizzard, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch129

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

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Keywords:

  • Case 19, exposed during a blizzard;
  • diagnosis - frostbite;
  • discussion on frostbite, cold-related injury - freezing of tissues, at or below freezing point of intact skin;
  • initial management, toward - assessing, core body temperature and hydration;
  • dry air rewarming, over camp fire – discouraged, because of thermal injury;
  • wounds, wrapped in sterile gauze - after application of topical aloe vera;
  • clear vesicles and bullae, rich in thromboxane - thought to increase tissue loss;
  • antithrombolytic therapy - shown to be of benefit, in several studies;
  • tissue plasminogen activator therapy - reversing thrombosis, patients with impaired perfusion;
  • use of technetium-99m “triple-phase” scanning - as technique to access perfusion

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading