143. Purulent Eye Discharge in an Adult

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch143

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) Purulent Eye Discharge in an Adult, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch143

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

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Keywords:

  • Case 33, purulent eye discharge - in adult;
  • diagnosis - bacterial conjunctivitis due to Neisseria gonorrhoeae;
  • discussion, bacterial conjunctivitis - affecting patients of all ages;
  • hyperacute, purulent conjunctivitis - severe form of bacterial conjunctivitis, associated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae;
  • broad-spectrum, topical antibiotic therapy - sufficient for most acute conjunctival infections;
  • gram staining, looking for Gram-negative - intracellular diplococci, culture and sensitivity of conjunctival scrapings;
  • treatment, for gonococcal conjunctivitis - requiring topical and systemic therapy;
  • treatment, for concomitant chlamydial co-infection - and evaluation of patient's sexual partners, recommended

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading