145. A Gagging Child

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch145

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) A Gagging Child, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch145

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

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Keywords:

  • Case 35, a gagging child;
  • diagnosis - esophageal foreign body;
  • evaluation of patients - ingesting foreign bodies, not uncommon in emergency department;
  • ingested foreign body, suspected - plain radiographs, of gastrointestinal tract, neck to rectum;
  • esophageal foreign bodies, distinguished - trapped in trachea, position on plain radiograph;
  • plain films, failing to identify - an ingested foreign body, high index of suspicion remaining;
  • objects, lodged in esophagus - lodged in coronal plane;
  • noncontrast computed tomography (CT) scan - for visualizing radiolucent foreign bodies, characterizing other pathology;
  • direct visualization of foreign body by endoscopy - diagnostic and therapeutic modality of choice, for symptomatic patients;
  • emetics (ipecac), not recommended - potential for aspiration and esophageal injury

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading