153. “Pink Eye” in a Contact Lens Wearer

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch153

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) “Pink Eye” in a Contact Lens Wearer, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch153

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Case 43 “Pink Eye” in a contact lens wearer;
  • diagnosis - corneal ulcer secondary to pseudomonas;
  • discussion, a large corneal ulcer - depicted by a fluffy stromal infiltrate, and an overlying epithelial defect;
  • bacterial corneal ulceration, most common infectious etiology - often sight-threatening;
  • virulent pathogens, rapid onset and progression - left untreated, progressing to perforation;
  • case history, being important - in determining cause of corneal ulceration;
  • traumatic ocular injuries, from vegetable matter - suspicion of a fungal etiology;
  • initial therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotic, recommended - until offending organism, being identified in culture

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading