154. Suspicious Hand Pain

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch154

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) Suspicious Hand Pain, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch154

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

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Keywords:

  • Case 44, suspicious hand pain;
  • diagnosis - Boxer's fracture;
  • discussion, fractures of fifth metacarpal neck - most common fractures in the hand;
  • metacarpal neck fractures, having an apex dorsal angulation;
  • metacarpal neck fractures, rarely requiring surgery - displaced fractures, managed with simple immobilization for 3–4 weeks;
  • surgeons, agreeing that - no more than 45 degrees of angulation, allowed in fifth metacarpal;
  • rotational injury, to be addressed - as this can impair function, resulting in deformity;
  • fractures of fifth metacarpal, seen - by orthopedic surgery within 1 week of injury

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading