159. Hand Pain after Striking a Wall

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch159

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) Hand Pain after Striking a Wall, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch159

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

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Keywords:

  • Case 49, hand pain - after striking a wall;
  • diagnosis, carpometacarpal dislocation - of fourth and fifth metacarpals;
  • carpometacarpal (CMC) joints - extremely stable, significant bony and ligamentous support;
  • neurovascular status of hand - carefully assessed in injuries;
  • vascular compromise, in patients with injury - to third metacarpal, deep palmar arterial arch;
  • critical issue in evaluation of CMC dislocations - recognition of associated metacarpal fractures;
  • emergency department, and closed reduction - with longitudinal traction;
  • hand being splinted, digital motion - encouraged, for preventing stiffness with swelling

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading