162. Leg Pain Following a Motor Vehicle Collision

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch162

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) Leg Pain Following a Motor Vehicle Collision, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch162

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Case 52, leg pain following a motor vehicle collision;
  • diagnosis - left hip fracture;
  • discussion, patient with left hip fracture - fractures, femoral head to subtrochanteric area;
  • displaced fractures, of femoral neck and intertrochanteric fractures - shortening and external rotation of lower extremity;
  • occult fracture, inability to flex the hip - or bear weight or pain, internal or external rotation;
  • complete trauma evaluation - being performed;
  • femur fractures, and loss of 2–3 units of blood - into thigh, and hemodynamic instability;
  • hip fractures, subtle appearance on X-ray - particularly in osteopenic bone;
  • occult fractures of hip, not being seen - on up to 10% of plain film radiography

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading