165. Lamp Oil Ingestion

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch165

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) Lamp Oil Ingestion, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch165

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

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Keywords:

  • Case 55, lamp oil ingestion;
  • diagnosis - hydrocarbon ingestion/aspiration;
  • discussion, accidental ingestion and aspiration - of hydrocarbons, fatal childhood poisoning;
  • low surface tension, permitting hydrocarbon - to spread rapidly, contact with respiratory tract;
  • clinical presentation - varying in hydrocarbon exposures;
  • neurologic symptoms, common - dizziness, euphoria, visual disturbances, seizures and coma;
  • respiratory sequelae, most concerning issue - in hydrocarbon exposures;
  • persistent, or worsening respiratory problems - evident within 6–8 hours of exposure;
  • bronchodilators, used for suspected bronchospasm;
  • prophylactic antibiotics, and steroids - not been shown to be useful, in acute phase of hydrocarbon exposures

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading