185. Abdominal Pain in a Trauma Victim

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch185

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) Abdominal Pain in a Trauma Victim, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch185

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Case 75, abdominal pain - in a trauma victim;
  • diagnosis - splenic rupture;
  • discussion on spleen, commonly injured intraperitoneal organ - from blunt abdominal trauma;
  • motor vehicle collisions, common mechanism - of injury in United States, direct blows to abdomen and falls;
  • alert patients, with abdominal pain - or left shoulder pain (Kehr's sign), left upper quadrant tenderness;
  • advances in diagnostic imaging - revolutionizing management of splenic injuries;
  • operative management - dependent on extent of injury;
  • nonoperative management of splenic injury - in discharged patients, bed rest 72 hours;
  • delayed splenic rupture, abdominal pain - or signs of internal bleeding, after asymptomatic period of at least 48 hours;
  • American Association for Surgery of Trauma Splenic Injury Scale

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading