189. Skin Lesions in a Comatose Patient

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch189

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) Skin Lesions in a Comatose Patient, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch189

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

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Keywords:

  • Case 79, skin lesions - in a comatose patient;
  • diagnosis - rhabdomyolysis;
  • rhabdomyolysis, as the breakdown - of skeletal muscle, due to injury;
  • muscle damage, and life-threatening complications - and myoglobinuric acute renal failure, hyperkalemia, disseminated intravascular coagulation;
  • primary laboratory test, and rhabdomyolysis - elevated serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK);
  • myoglobin, functioning as oxygen store - in skeletal muscle fibers;
  • toxicologic causes of note - sympathomimetics and statin drugs;
  • complications of rhabdomyolysis - due to local effects of muscle injury, systemic effects of released muscle components;
  • acute renal failure - most common complication of rhabdomyolysis;
  • hyperkalemia, precipitating dysrhythmias - and cardiac arrest

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading