191. Fall on an Outstretched Hand in a Young Adolescent

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch191

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) Fall on an Outstretched Hand in a Young Adolescent, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch191

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Case 81, fall on outstretched hand - in a young adolescent;
  • diagnosis - distal radius fracture, Salter–Harris type I;
  • musculoskeletal injuries - common cause, for pediatric emergency department visits;
  • cartilaginous centers, and growth of new bone - inherent weak point, in developing skeleton;
  • Salter–Harris classification system - most commonly to describe injuries;
  • Salter–Harris type IV injuries (10%) – fracture, originating at articular surface, through epiphysis;
  • Salter–Harris type I injury, appropriately managed - with splint immobilization, intermittent icing, elevation;
  • type V injuries, and orthopedic consultation - with casting, limited use of involved extremity

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Further reading