215. Young Athlete with Back Pain

  1. Christopher P. Holstege MD1,2,3,
  2. Alexander B. Baer MD1,4,
  3. Jesse M. Pines MD, MBA, MSCE5,6 and
  4. William J. Brady MD7,8,9

Published Online: 3 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch215

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition

How to Cite

Holstege, C. P., Baer, A. B., Pines, J. M. and Brady, W. J. (eds) (2011) Young Athlete with Back Pain, in Visual Diagnosis in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444397994.ch215

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Medical Toxicology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  2. 2

    Blue Ridge Poison Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Emergency Medicine & Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  5. 5

    Center for Health Care Quality, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  6. 6

    Departments of Emergency Medicine and Health Policy, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

  7. 7

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  8. 8

    Center for Emergency Management, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

  9. 9

    Charlottesville-Albemarle Rescue Squad & Albemarle County, Fire Rescue, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333473

Online ISBN: 9781444397994

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Keywords:

  • Case 105, young athlete with back pain;
  • diagnosis - pars defect at L5;
  • discussion, lower back pain - in young athletic patient, common phenomenon;
  • pars defect (spondylolysis), defect of posterior bony spine - interruption in vertebral arch, between superior and inferior articular processes;
  • pre-existing spinal abnormalities - as spina bifida occulta, and higher risk of spondylolysis;
  • disorder, often asymptomatic - associated with significant morbidity;
  • patients, with bilateral spondylolysis - progressing to spondylolisthesis, forward slippage of adjacent vertebrae;
  • plain radiographs of lumbar spine - of anteroposterior, lateral and oblique views obtained;
  • management in emergency department - analgesia and activity limitation;
  • bracing and surgery - needed, if no response to conservative management