4. Mitochondrial Changes in Aging with Particular Reference to Muscle, and Possible Clinical Consequences

  1. Valerie Askanas MD, PhD and
  2. W. King Engel MD
  1. Salvatore Dimauro MD1,
  2. Eric Schon PhD2 and
  3. Michio Hirano MD1

Published Online: 19 DEC 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444398311.ch4

Muscle Aging, Inclusion-Body Myositis and Myopathies

Muscle Aging, Inclusion-Body Myositis and Myopathies

How to Cite

Dimauro, S., Schon, E. and Hirano, M. (2012) Mitochondrial Changes in Aging with Particular Reference to Muscle, and Possible Clinical Consequences, in Muscle Aging, Inclusion-Body Myositis and Myopathies (eds V. Askanas and W. K. Engel), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444398311.ch4

Editor Information

  1. Departments of Neurology and Pathology, University of Southern California Neuromuscular Center, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA

  2. 2

    Departments of Neurology, and Genetics and Development, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 DEC 2011
  2. Published Print: 27 JAN 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405196468

Online ISBN: 9781444398311

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • apoptosis;
  • dietary restriction;
  • exercise;
  • mitochondria;
  • mitochondrial DNA;
  • mtDNA;
  • oxidative stress;
  • sarcopenia

Summary

Age-related muscle atrophy (sarcopenia) starts at about 40 years and leads to muscle frailty and frequent falls in the aged population. There is ample evidence that sarcopenia is due, at least in large measure, to age-related accumulations of large-scale deletions and point mutationsin somatic mitochondrial DNA. This is accompanied by excessive production of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and by activation of the mitochondrial pathway of caspase activation and apoptosis. While the ravages of aging cannot be avoided, robust evidence suggests that sarcopenia can be delayed and attenuated by aerobic exercise and dietary restriction.