13. Sample Collection, Processing, and Storage for Molecular Genetic Testing

  1. Kandice Kottke-Marchant MD, PhD5,6,7 and
  2. Bruce H. Davis MD8
  1. Bobby L. Boyanton Jr. MD1,2 and
  2. Domnita Crisan MD, PhD3,4

Published Online: 8 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781444398595.ch13

Laboratory Hematology Practice

Laboratory Hematology Practice

How to Cite

Boyanton, B. L. and Crisan, D. (2012) Sample Collection, Processing, and Storage for Molecular Genetic Testing, in Laboratory Hematology Practice (eds K. Kottke-Marchant and B. H. Davis), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444398595.ch13

Editor Information

  1. 5

    Pathology & Laboratory Medicine Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA

  2. 6

    Department of Pathology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA

  3. 7

    Hemostasis and Thrombosis, Department of Clinical Pathology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA

  4. 8

    Trillium Diagnostics, LLC, Bangor, ME, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, MI, USA

  2. 2

    Beaumont Hospital, Department of Clinical Pathology, Royal Oak, MI, USA

  3. 3

    Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, MI, USA

  4. 4

    William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Clinical Pathology, Royal Oak, MI, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 AUG 2012
  2. Published Print: 10 APR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405162180

Online ISBN: 9781444398595

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Keywords:

  • nucleic acid;
  • DNA;
  • RNA;
  • integrity;
  • collection;
  • extraction;
  • processing;
  • quantitation;
  • storage;
  • pre-analytical

Summary

Hematology has been and continues to be at the forefront of applying molecular diagnostics and molecular monitoring in the management of patients with hematologic malignancies and inherited disorders. The technology has evolved rapidly over the last decade from hybridization assays and target and signal amplification to gene expression profiling and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis, and more recently to microarray technology and whole genome analysis. All of these advanced methodologies critically depend on the nature of the nucleic acids obtained from patient specimens. Results cannot be obtained nor interpreted correctly if the quality and quantity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) is not optimal for the specific molecular application. Multiple issues related to the type of patient specimen, collection and processing, extraction methodologies, stability, and storage for nucleic acids are reviewed.