97. Dealing with the Emotional Distress following Failed IVF

  1. Khaldoun Sharif MBBCh, MD, FRCOG, MFFP3 and
  2. Arri Coomarasamy MBChB, MD, MRCOG4
  1. Linda Hammer Burns PhD1,2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781444398854.ch97

Assisted Reproduction Techniques: Challenges and Management Options

Assisted Reproduction Techniques: Challenges and Management Options

How to Cite

Burns, L. H. (2012) Dealing with the Emotional Distress following Failed IVF, in Assisted Reproduction Techniques: Challenges and Management Options (eds K. Sharif and A. Coomarasamy), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444398854.ch97

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Istishari Fertility Center, Istishari Hospital, Amman, Jordan

  2. 4

    University of Birmingham and Birmingham Women's Hospital, Birmingham, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA

  2. 2

    Reproductive Medicine Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2012
  2. Published Print: 10 APR 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444335552

Online ISBN: 9781444398854

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • ART;
  • ICSI;
  • IVF failure;
  • anxiety;
  • depression;
  • emotional distress

Summary

Many couples experience sub-clinical levels of distress, anxiety, or depressive symptoms following a failed IVF cycle. Although the majority are well-adjusted and resilient, some experience more serious emotional distress that may last for years. Giving bad news, such as IVF failure, is also distressing for the treating physician. The chapter discusses practical management options to deal with these stresses.