Chapter 15. Thermal Processing of Food: Allergenicity

  1. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)
  1. Prof. Dr. Lars K. Poulsen

Published Online: 19 JUN 2007

DOI: 10.1002/9783527611492.ch15

Thermal Processing of Food: Potential Health Benefits and Risks

Thermal Processing of Food: Potential Health Benefits and Risks

How to Cite

Poulsen, L. K. (2007) Thermal Processing of Food: Allergenicity, in Thermal Processing of Food: Potential Health Benefits and Risks (ed Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527611492.ch15

Author Information

  1. Allergy Clinic, National University Hospital, Department 7551, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUN 2007
  2. Published Print: 23 FEB 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527319091

Online ISBN: 9783527611492

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Keywords:

  • thermal processing of food;
  • health benefits;
  • health risks;
  • allergenicity;
  • ability to induce an IgE-response;
  • sensitize the patient;
  • capability to induce a reaction leading to symptomatic food allergy in an already sensitized patient. by traditionally physico-chemical methods;
  • gel electrophoresis;
  • circular dichroism;
  • employ food allergological methods

Summary

The allergenicity or allergenic potential to food may be understood in two ways: 1) as the ability to induce an IgE-response, to sensitize the patient; and 2) as the capability to induce a reaction leading to symptomatic food allergy in an already sensitized patient. We have still only limited knowledge of the former process, and the latter will be the primary focus of this paper. Thermal processing of foods may induce a plethora of biochemical reactions that can be characterized by traditionally physico-chemical methods such as gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism etc., but in order to evaluate the allergenicity it is necessary to employ food allergological methods based on patient material from well characterized food allergic patients. These methods range from the final in vivo confirmation of allergenicity by double-blinded placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFC), over skin prick tests (SPT) to the in vitro methods histamine release from basophils and IgE-based techniques such as the RadioAllergoSorbentTest (RAST) and inhibition variants of this technique.