Chapter 14. Replacement of Laboratory Animals in the Management of Blood-Sucking Arthropods

  1. Dr. Christoph A Reinhardt
  1. Achim E. Issmer,
  2. Thomas H. Schilling,
  3. Andreas Vollmer and
  4. Jörg Grunewald

Published Online: 8 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527616053.ch14

Alternatives to Animal Testing: New Ways in the Biomedical Sciences, Trends and Progress, Second Edition

Alternatives to Animal Testing: New Ways in the Biomedical Sciences, Trends and Progress, Second Edition

How to Cite

Issmer, A. E., Schilling, T. H., Vollmer, A. and Grunewald, J. (1994) Replacement of Laboratory Animals in the Management of Blood-Sucking Arthropods, in Alternatives to Animal Testing: New Ways in the Biomedical Sciences, Trends and Progress, Second Edition (ed C. A. Reinhardt), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527616053.ch14

Editor Information

  1. SIAT Swiss Institute for Alternatives to Animal Testing, Technopark, Pfingstweidstr. 30, CH-8005 Zürich

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527300433

Online ISBN: 9783527616053

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Keywords:

  • blood-feeding;
  • Hyalomma truncatum;
  • hard ticks;
  • simuliidae;
  • human pathogenic filariases

Summary

Blood-sucking arthropods transmit a variety of infectious agents. For the research on vectorborne diseases the maintenance of such vectors in the laboratory is inevitable. The feeding of these arthropods requires the blood of living animals, and the replacement of these laboratory animals used for blood-feeding is our primary objective. Artificial feeding techniques of different Diptera, e. g. Aedes aegypti, Culicoides nubeculosus and Simuliidae, or bugs, such as Triatoma infestans, Dipetalogaster maximus and Rhodnius prolixus, and of the soft tick Ornithodorus moubata have been established in our laboratory. Most recently, we also developed an artificial membrane feeding technique for the adults of the hard ticks Hyalomma truncatum and Ixodes ricinus, as well as for the blood-feeding stages of the mite Ornithonyssus bacoti.