Chapter 6. Animal Use and Alternatives: Developments in the Netherlands

  1. Dr. Christoph A Reinhardt
  1. L. F. M. van Zutphen

Published Online: 8 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9783527616053.ch6

Alternatives to Animal Testing: New Ways in the Biomedical Sciences, Trends and Progress, Second Edition

Alternatives to Animal Testing: New Ways in the Biomedical Sciences, Trends and Progress, Second Edition

How to Cite

van Zutphen, L. F. M. (1994) Animal Use and Alternatives: Developments in the Netherlands, in Alternatives to Animal Testing: New Ways in the Biomedical Sciences, Trends and Progress, Second Edition (ed C. A. Reinhardt), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527616053.ch6

Editor Information

  1. SIAT Swiss Institute for Alternatives to Animal Testing, Technopark, Pfingstweidstr. 30, CH-8005 Zürich

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 24 FEB 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527300433

Online ISBN: 9783527616053

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Keywords:

  • vertebrate animals;
  • animal experiments;
  • proposed protocol;
  • affecting an animal's;
  • teaching aids

Summary

Recent developments are described which have contributed to the reduction of animal use, to the welfare of experimental animals, and to the quality of animal experiments. Legislation has been the main impetus behind most of these developments. The developments described here are the establishment of: the Platform for Alternatives to Animal Experiments (1987), which has a budget of 1.5 million guilders per year for funding the search for alternatives; b) a national center for alternatives, expected to be operational by 1994; c) institutional animal experimentation committees with the task of advising on the admissibility of experiments based upon balancing the benefit of the experiment against the suffering of the animals; d) training programs, which have been made compulsory by law for persons who are involved in animal experimentation; and e) the information center (PREX) at the Department of Laboratory Animal Science, Utrecht, with computerized databases on several aspects of animal use and alternatives. These activities support the general policy of most institutions which have a license for animal experimentation, which is to reduce animal use and to introduce alternatives wherever feasible.